Friday, February 28, 2014

Your Favorite Interstate Exits: I-95 in New Hampshire & Massachusetts

Georges Island and Fort Warren in Boston Harbo...
Georges Island and Fort Warren in Boston Harbor, and part of the Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Interstate 95 runs for 16 miles in New Hampshire as the Blue Star Tollway. It links Portsmouth and Hampton. Hampton Beach, the Atlantic Ocean, Great Bay and the Fort Constitution State Historical Site are near this highway.

In Massachusetts, Interstate 95 travels for 91 miles and connects the cities of Amesbury, Danvers, Boston, Canton and Attleboro. Salisbury Beach, the Atlantic Ocean, Plum Island, Parker River National Wildlife Refuge, Boston Harbor Islands National Recreation Area, John F. Kennedy National Historical Site, Massapoag Lake, Walden Pond and Dighton Rock State Park are places of interest located near this interstate. Cape Cod National Seashore is to the east of this highway.

Please share with other drivers your experiences as to which exits are best for single travelers or anyone for that matter. Reasons for the choice may include the safety of the surrounding area, the availability of good hotels and restaurants or proximity to the interstate. Please make sure to give the exit number or a description of the location. For example, when I discuss I-40, I would recommend Exit 145 in Oklahoma City. Many hotels and restaurants were located at this exit and I felt safe in the area. This exit was very convenient for easily continuing west without the hassle of dealing with early morning rush hour traffic.

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Tuesday, February 25, 2014

On the Road: When the Unthinkable Happens

Many people travel the interstates especially in the summer. Things can go wrong. Accidents happen and people are injured. Sometimes travelers can pass away. Until this past summer I had not given the matter much thought. That is when the unthinkable happened to people I know. Since I want to protect the privacy of the family, I will just say that one of the family members passed away on a trip. The individuals had stopped before continuing on their journey and were visiting relatives when this situation occurred, so they had the support and assistance of the family in coping with a shocking event.


I wondered what travelers should do if a member of the family died while the group was on the road, so I called my insurance agent for some advice. She told me that was a situation insurance agents do not encounter unless an accident has occurred. Her suggestion was to call the insurance's claim office anyway. They might be able to suggest a funeral home or at least give advice about the area.

The only other source of advice I received came from a local funeral home. I started to explain the reason behind my inquiry, but he already knew the story. The funeral director's advice was for travelers to ask the local coroner for a recommendation for a funeral home. He felt the coroner's office would be aware of the best and most honest funeral homes.

If a person travels alone, he should make sure to have identification available so the police can contact the next of kin. That information can be available on the cell phone; however, in case the cell phone is locked, have contact information near the driver's license where police can easily find it.

(Photo taken in 2013)

Friday, February 21, 2014

Your Favorite Interstate Exits: I-95 in Maine

English: Hamlin Peak of Mount Katahdin in Baxt...
English: Hamlin Peak of Mount Katahdin in Baxter State Park, Maine as seen from Baxter Peak (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Anyone who lives on the East Coast is familiar with Interstate 95. Many times it has been described as a slowly moving parking lot. I-95 is 1,920 miles long and runs along the eastern coast of the United States. This highway, which starts at the Canadian border, travels for 303 miles in Maine and links the cities of Houlton, East Millinocket, Howland, Banger, Waterville, Augusta, Auburn, Lewiston, Portland, Saco and Biddeford. From Augusta south to the state line, this highway becomes the Maine Turnpike which does have a toll. Drivers can take I-295 to save some money.

Attractions located near this interstate include the Allagash Wilderness Waterway, Acadia National Park, Penobscot River, Atlantic Ocean, Portland Observatory, Peaks Island, Baxter State Park, Mount Katahdin, the Appalachian Trail, Bradbury Mountain State Park, Sebago Lake, Cape Elizabeth and numerous lakes.

Please share with other drivers your experiences as to which exits are best for single travelers or anyone for that matter. Reasons for the choice may include the safety of the surrounding area, the availability of good hotels and restaurants or proximity to the interstate. Please make sure to give the exit number or a description of the location. For example, when I discuss I-40, I would recommend Exit 145 in Oklahoma City. Many hotels and restaurants were located at this exit and I felt safe in the area. This exit was very convenient for easily continuing west without the hassle of dealing with early morning rush hour traffic.
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Tuesday, February 18, 2014

Your Favorite Interstate Exits: I-94 in Montana

Photo of Bighorn Lake, Wyoming (and Montana), ...
Photo of Bighorn Lake, Wyoming (and Montana), Southwestern portion, taken from an aircraft at approximately 40000 feet. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Interstate 94 travels 249 miles in Montana. I-94 ends its journey halfway through the state when it intersects I-90 at Billings. This highway joins that city with Miles City and Glendive. Attractions near this interstate include Little Bighorn National Battlefield, Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area, Pompey Pillar National Monument, Makoshika State Park, Yellowstone River, Nez Perce National Historical Park and Canyon Creek Battlefield. To the northwest of the end of this interstate is Glacier National Park. To the southwest is Yellowstone National Park and Grand Teton National Park.

Please share with other drivers your experiences as to which exits are best for single travelers or anyone for that matter. Reasons for the choice may include the safety of the surrounding area, the availability of good hotels and restaurants or proximity to the interstate. Please make sure to give the exit number or a description of the location. For example, when I discuss I-40, I would recommend Exit 145 in Oklahoma City. Many hotels and restaurants were located at this exit and I felt safe in the area. This exit was very convenient for easily continuing west without the hassle of dealing with early morning rush hour traffic.
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Friday, February 14, 2014

Your Favorite Interstate Exits: I-94 in North Dakota

Interstate 94 is the only interstate to run east-west in the state of North Dakota. In Fargo I-94 intersects I-29 which is the only north-south interstate in North Dakota. This highway travels 352 across the state and joins the cities of Fargo, Valley City, Jamestown, Bismarck, Mandan and Dickinson. Attractions near this interstate are the Missouri River, Lake Oahe, Fort Rice State Historical Site, Fort Abraham Lincoln State Park, Theodore Roosevelt National Park, Killdeer Mountains and Sentinel Butte.

English: View of the Little Missouri River flo...
English: View of the Little Missouri River flowing through Theodore Roosevelt National Park in the U.S. state of North Dakota (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Please share with other drivers your experiences as to which exits are best for single travelers or anyone for that matter. Reasons for the choice may include the safety of the surrounding area, the availability of good hotels and restaurants or proximity to the interstate. Please make sure to give the exit number or a description of the location. For example, when I discuss I-40, I would recommend Exit 145 in Oklahoma City. Many hotels and restaurants were located at this exit and I felt safe in the area. This exit was very convenient for easily continuing west without the hassle of dealing with early morning rush hour traffic.
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Tuesday, February 11, 2014

On the Road: Being Followed?

Wizard Island - Crater Lake Oregon
Wizard Island - Crater Lake Oregon (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Sometimes drivers decide talking to other travelers on the road is harmless, and in most cases that is true. When I am driving cross-country, I usually do not pay a whole lot of attention to other people. When I am sightseeing, I am more observant. On a trip to Crater Lake one time I noticed a man was following me. I decided to take the boat trip to Wizard Island so I could lose him. He followed. Everywhere I went on the island, I noticed he went as well. When it was time to take the boat back to the lodge, I told the boat operator what was happening. He informed some of the people at the beginning of the line of the situation. When the boat was loading, the operator asked for one available person to ride in the boat. The people, who were in line in front of me, let me get on the boat and some started talking to the man who had been following me to keep him busy. I was able to get to my car and get out of there with no more problems.

That was not the only time I have been followed. Sometimes I am followed by cars and even trucks. I asked some truckers about this and they said sometimes truckers will pass a car and then slow down. When the car then passes the truck, the trucker will speed up and pass the car again. According to them, this is a game to alleviate the boredom of the trip. Here is what I do to end it...and I have had to do this many times. I get off at an exit and pull into a travel plaza. If he decides to follow me, the trucker has to slow down to enter the station, but he cannot accomplish this as quickly as the driver of a car can do. As the truck pulls into the station, I drive through the plaza and back onto the interstate again. I am way ahead of him before he can try to follow me again.

If I were in a populated area and noticed a car following me, I could go to a police station. If I felt uncomfortable getting out of the car, I would just blast the car horn until an officer came out to check what was happening. Drivers must still be cautious even though they are at the police station. They are not safe until the police are with them. Another option would be to call 911. Trying to see the license plate of another vehicle while I am driving might be difficult. The easiest thing to do is just give the police a description of my vehicle and my license plate number. They would then know the car near me is the vehicle they need to investigate. In addition, I try to note the mile markers every once in a while, so I have an idea of where I am in case I need to call the Highway Patrol for help.

When traveling alone, I try to always be aware of my surroundings. I am never afraid to ask for help and I always trust my gut when I suspect something could affect my safety. I feel it is better to be paranoid and take actions to protect myself than to ignore the situation and put myself in harm's way.
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Friday, February 7, 2014

Your Favorite Interstate Exits: I-94 in Minnesota

Dalles of the St. Croix River, from the Wiscon...
Dalles of the St. Croix River, from the Wisconsin bank. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
For the 259 miles it spends in Minnesota, Interstate 94 travels on a diagonal northwest from where it enters the state at St. Paul. I-94 joins this city with Minneapolis, St. Cloud and Moorhead. Attractions near this highway include the Mississippi River, Red River, Sinclair Lewis Boyhood Home and Museum, Land of Lakes, Minnehaha Falls, St. Croix River, Interstate Park, The Dalles of the St. Croix River, Lower St. Croix Scenic Riverway and Mille Lacs Lake.

Please share with other drivers your experiences as to which exits are best for single travelers or anyone for that matter. Reasons for the choice may include the safety of the surrounding area, the availability of good hotels and restaurants or proximity to the interstate. Please make sure to give the exit number or a description of the location. For example, when I discuss I-40, I would recommend Exit 145 in Oklahoma City. Many hotels and restaurants were located at this exit and I felt safe in the area. This exit was very convenient for easily continuing west without the hassle of dealing with early morning rush hour traffic.


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Tuesday, February 4, 2014

Your Favorite Interstate Exits: I-94 in Wisconsin

Lake Monona, in Madison, Wisconsin
Lake Monona, in Madison, Wisconsin (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Interstate 94 travels 348 miles in the state of Wisconsin. This highway enters the state near Pleasant Prairie and runs north. Located west of Kenosha and Racine,  this interstate turns west at Milwaukee to travel to Madison. I-94 joins I-90 and the two go through Portage and New Lisbon. The two highways part just before Tomah and I-94 continues west through Eau Claire. Attractions along the way include Lake Michigan, Menomonee , Lake Mendota, Lake Monona, Wisconsin River, Mississippi River, the Wisconsin Dells and Crystal Cave.

Please share with other drivers your experiences as to which exits are best for single travelers or anyone for that matter. Reasons for the choice may include the safety of the surrounding area, the availability of good hotels and restaurants or proximity to the interstate. Please make sure to give the exit number or a description of the location. For example, when I discuss I-40, I would recommend Exit 145 in Oklahoma City. Many hotels and restaurants were located at this exit and I felt safe in the area. This exit was very convenient for easily continuing west without the hassle of dealing with early morning rush hour traffic.

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